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Posts tagged with ‘freedom of speech’

  • Republicans buy shoes too

    By Matt Impink on December 10, 2014
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    To many kids who grew up in my generation, they remember Michael Jordan as the greatest player ever to play the game as he won six NBA championships during my childhood. Contrasting Jordan to Charles Barkley who famously said “I’m not a role model,” Jordan seemed like the polished embodiment of a winner and role model for kids. I still […]
  • The Lessons of Town of Greece v. Galloway for Campaign Finance Laws

    By David Schultz on May 8, 2014
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    The Supreme Court’s recent Town of Greece v. Galloway ruling upholding invocation of a prayer before the start of a local town board meeting is not a decision that one would think would be of significance to election law, but it is.  Specifically, the Court’s discussion about coercion and religious beliefs has potential importance to those arguing against campaign finance […]
  • The Decision- Predicting the Supreme Court Prayer Case

    By Donald E. Knebel on May 6, 2014
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    Last November, I posted a blog predicting how the Supreme Court would rule in a case challenging the right of the town of Greece, New York, to open meetings of its town board with prayers, most of them with a decidedly Christian viewpoint.  At the time, I promised to report on the accuracy of my predictions once the decision had […]
  • Duck Calls and Pilgrims: Religious Freedom in America

    By Donald E. Knebel on December 26, 2013
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    A&E’s suspension of “Duck Dynasty’s” Phil Robertson for an interview in which he seemingly equated “homosexuals” with “terrorists” and “homosexual behavior” with “bestiality” based on his interpretation of the Bible has caused an outcry from conservative commentators and politicians, including Ted Cruz and Sarah Palin, who characterize the suspension as an attack on “religious liberty” and “free speech.”  It plainly […]
  • Predicting the Supreme Court Prayer Case

    By Donald E. Knebel on November 18, 2013
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    On November 6, 2013, the United States Supreme Court heard arguments on one of the most vexing issues under the First Amendment to the United States Constitution —  When does the Constitutionally required governmental allowance of religious practices cross the line into Constitutionally prohibited governmental endorsement of religion?  The specific issue in the case is whether the town council of […]
  • Constitutional Rights and Wrongs – Part II

    By Donald E. Knebel on November 7, 2013
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    My last post tested your general knowledge of the United States Constitution.  This True/False test determines your knowledge of the “Bill of Rights,” the first ten amendments to the Constitution.  At the end you will find both the answers and a way to score your own Bill of Rights literacy.  Note:  Although the precise wording of the questions is important, […]
  • Strikingly Unconstitutional

    By Donald E. Knebel on September 16, 2013
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    Whenever the United States Supreme Court decides that a law enacted by Congress is unconstitutional, supporters of the law rail against “unelected judges” exercising a power not found in the Constitution.  The reaction to the recent decision involving the “Defense of Marriage Act” is typical, showing that most citizens don’t understand why or how judges can, in the popular phrase, […]