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Posts tagged with ‘voting’

  • Civic Literacy and our 2016 Election Choices

    By Sheila Kennedy on April 22, 2016
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    As Indiana’s primary approaches, it’s time to look at the 2016 election landscape as objectively as possible. None of us is truly objective, of course. I look at the “still standing” Presidential candidates from the perspective of someone who teaches public administration, supports civil liberties, and has had a fair amount of first-hand political experience. I’m also old enough to […]
  • Electing Our Future: A Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise Indianapolis

    By The Center for Civic Literacy on September 4, 2015
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    More Blogs. More Info. Why Local Elections Matter Why Should I Care? Can We Make You Care?
  • Tending to the Nitty-Gritty

    By Sheila Kennedy on August 14, 2015
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    Our televisions and Internet feeds are rapidly filling with coverage of the 2016 Presidential race. It’s hard to fault the media for its fascination with our quadrennial political spectacle, especially since the Republican field contains no fewer than seventeen candidates (at this count—who knows what other hats may be flung into the ring), many of whom are happily demonstrating that […]
  • Why Hoosiers Don’t Vote

    By Sheila Kennedy on May 8, 2015
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    The following post was originally published at sheilakennedy.net on May 6th, 2015 and is republished here with the author’s permission. Yesterday, I took part in a “Pancakes and Politics” discussion hosted by the Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce. There were three of us on the panel–yours truly, Beth White (former Marion County Clerk) and Abdul Shabazz (local radio personality and commentator/provocateur). Abdul has actually […]
  • Partisan and Economic Cues Fail to Help Low-Information Voters Choose the Correct Presidential Candidate

    By Aaron Dusso on April 24, 2015
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    Every major election in the U.S. produces a steady drumbeat of calls from scholars and interested observers for a solution to the problem of citizens’ political apathy. Turnout is abysmal and thoughtful individuals want to fix it. However, this focus on turnout overlooks the fact that democratic governance does not simply rely on participation. It relies on quality participation. Theorists […]
  • A New Voting Rights Act

    By Matt Impink on October 9, 2014
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    In 1964, about 700 college students from around the country descended upon Mississippi for what came to be called Freedom Summer. At the time literacy tests, intimidation and violence kept all but 7% of black citizens registered to vote despite the fact that black citizens outnumbered whites in many counties throughout the Mississippi Delta. The students worked as organizers with […]
  • Eating our young…

    By Matt Impink on September 30, 2014
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    There has been a lot of irresponsible journalism lately making sweeping generalizations about the so-called Millennial Generation. Beyond being annoying and contradictory to be called achievement-obsessed and lazy at the same time, there seems to be little interest in my generation to engage in the very institutions that our elders currently control. Catherine Rampell of the Washington Post summarizes: Distressingly, […]
  • Voting: Bedrock of Democracy

    By Matt Impink on May 20, 2014
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    In response to John Guy’s recent post on voter turnout, I felt compelled to strongly rebut his claims. Guy claims that low voter turnout is not a threat to our democracy and that criticism about not voting is a side show for commentators and politicians. He also asserts that low voter turnout will actually help reduce the costs of elections […]
  • Voter Turnout

    By John Guy on May 19, 2014
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    Commentators and candidates deplore low turnout of voters, such as for Indiana’s recent primaries.  Sadly for those who pontificate about voting habits, no person has offered proof that our democracy is threatened by low turnout, or that high turnout changes results. Odds are small that voter turnout is important, or worth time studying or criticizing.  Whether intended, criticism is personal; […]
  • Why Political Ignorance Matters

    By Ilya Somin on October 28, 2013
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    The first big question I ask in Democracy and Political Ignorance is why we should care about political ignorance in the first place. Political knowledge may not have much inherent value. But even if we don’t value it for its own sake, it matters a great deal for instrumental reasons. I. Why Voter Ignorance Can be Dangerous Some legal and political […]
  • Voter Registration 2.0

    By Matt Impink on September 27, 2013
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    Tuesday was National Voter Registration Day and got me thinking about the state of our elections in our country. While 2013 isn’t the biggest year for elections (except if you are in New York, New Jersey or Virginia), it’s still crucially important to think about how we can increase the percentage of registered voters in our communities. By taking the […]
  • Engaging Those Tricky Millennials

    By admin on July 23, 2013
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    In a major boost for Indianapolis last week, the Circle City hosted MCON13 in conjunction with the release of the 2013 Millennial Impact Report, a national conversation on how to engage my generation. Like many my age strapped with college debt, I decided against spending the ironic $450 to attend in person and instead watched for free online. It was […]
  • Informed Electorate Needed

    By Sheila Suess Kennedy on July 22, 2013
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    Most Americans are currently enjoying the hiatus between elections, and while partisans are busily positioning themselves for the next round, it may be worth considering what sort of informed electorate democracy requires. If electoral processes are to produce satisfactory results, voters need information—at a minimum, voters need to understand the responsibilities of the offices being sought, and the legal and ethical obligations […]